Tag Archives: Temple Rome

Buona Pasqua!

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     Spending La Pasqua (a.k.a. Easter) in Rome when I live literally right outside of the Vatican City walls is a unique experience. Thousands of people travel to Rome for La Pasqua from all over world, especially to see the Pope give Sunday mass. In fact, so many people come to see the Pope that you actually have to get tickets in order to go. I decided not to get tickets in order to avoid the crazy crowds, plus I can practically see the Pope out of my back window anyways. However, you are able to watch the Pope live on television during Easter mass.

     There are a few Italian traditions during Easter that differ from those in the states. While we usually have marshmallow peeps, big chocolate Easter bunnies, and (my personal favorite) peanut butter eggs, these are not typical in Italy. One of the main Italian traditions is giving a huge, hollow chocolate egg that holds some sort of small gift inside. It reminds me of our easter egg hunts with little candies inside but on a bigger scale. Another Italian classic for La Pasqua is a traditional cake called a Colomba. This cake is shaped like a dove and very simple, but absolutely delicious! My italian class shared a colomba to celebrate the holiday.

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Colomba

     Spending a major holiday away from your family can be hard and I definitely missed seeing all of my family and having our usual big Easter meal this year, but I am very lucky that I have found a new family of friends here in Rome to celebrate with. My roommate and I hosted a huge Pasqua Brunch Extravaganza at our apartment with all of our closest friends. Just like the Italians, we used food to bring us together, but just like Americans, we wanted a huge, real brunch, not just a cornetto and caffè. Together we cooked sausages, potatoes with some vegetables, french toast, and homemade simple syrup. We even made mimosas with some freshly squeezed orange juice and Italian prosecco. The Pasqua Brunch Extravaganza was a success and I would not have spent it any other way.

     The day after Easter, a lot of the city is still shut down. Many businesses and all of the schools are still closed and it is typical to see people outside and enjoying the day off to relax. We decided to take a trip to see the Giardino Degli Aranci, or the Garden of Oranges, in Rome. It is a small garden, but a beautiful one. It is surrounded by a tall, brick wall and filled with orange trees. You can actually smell the orange in the air when you are in the garden. The garden is also on top of a hill and has a beautiful view over the city. The weather was perfect so we packed a lunch and had a picnic in the garden. All in all, it was a flawless holiday weekend and I was happy to spend it in Rome so I could soak up every ounce of this city before I leave in just two weeks.

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Giardino Degli Aranci

 

Tipografia Tipica

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I’m not one of the lucky ones.

I’m not an art major, or history, or architecture. I’m not even psychology or international business. I’m advertising, graphic design.

Which means there’s no classes for my major offered here. For the most part, that’s totally fine. I’m taking classes to complete my minor and finishing up some stray elective credits. I’m not stressing over needing certain grades in required courses, worrying about my major and graduating while travelling. It’s less stress for me, and that’s great.

But, as silly as it sounds, I picked my major for a reason- I like it. I miss doing design work. I’m getting technical practice in, with my drawing classes, but it’s not the same. I never thought I’d actually miss sitting in front of a computer, staring at a screen for hours while moving the same piece of text back and forth, trying to figure out which position looks best. Yet here I am. The other day, I even redesigned my resume, just to have some excuse to open up InDesign again. (And, okay, maybe I was looking for an excuse to procrastinate actually applying to internships. But that’s beside the point). And even the non-design stuff- there’s no one here to talk about whether Tinder Online is more effective than the app (it’s not) or how co-working spaces are becoming popular in other countries, too. It may sound dorky, but advertising, media, graphic design… it’s genuinely my passion. It’s been a bit weird to have an entire semester where I’m not doing it anymore.

So I’ve been trying to find little graphic design things in my every day life in Rome, so I can have something to geek out over. I mentioned my love for art and street art in Italy a few blog posts ago, and I know I mentioned typography in that post.

Typography, for me, is not just pretty letters. It’s an ad, a brand, in itself. It tells people the mood, the theme, of whatever the business is. For example- a Michelin-star rated restaurant won’t use, say, Comic Sans, on their menu. But an invite for a child’s birthday party could. (Well, nobody should ever use Comic Sans.) It’s all about conveying a message, and I’ve been having a lot of fun reading the messages of type- not only in Rome, but in all of my travels. It’s been one of my favorite things so far, seeing how location and culture affect the signage and letterforms of each city. They all have such a distinct feeling, and that’s what good type should do.

In Rome, most of the best type is in front of bars and trattorias (small, family style restaurants that are usually cheaper and not as fancy as the Italian ristorante) Italians love their food, so it would only make sense that the type reflects that. Italian type also has a very distinct look to it- it’s bold, blocky, and usually has an outline. There’s also very few neon signs- Rome once instated a neon tax. Any storefront with a neon sign would have to pay a tax on it. So, in the true Roman way, everyone just installed new, not-neon signs. Another thing I like is how everything looks Italian, even the post boxes and man-hole covers.

Greek type was one of my favorites. Perhaps because it was entirely different letterforms, giving new design possibilities, or maybe because it was all so quintessentially Greek.  It’s linear, geometric, and very straight-forward. There’s not a lot of frills to Greek signage, and I really like it. There was nothing to distract from the words.

Paris was interesting, in general, but also for it’s signs. Some were very modern, sans-serif and blocky, and others were very classic: serif and script fonts, very decorative. It fits with the image of Paris as a city that is the height of class and fashion. Its type is trendy for every decade. The modern signs followed modern, trendy design aesthetics and others followed much older trends. Either way, it supported the idea of what Paris is- trendy, yet still a city with a lot of history.

London was the same as Paris in that sense- some of it’s signs were very modern, and others took clear inspiration from London’s extensive history. Those were the signs I was drawn to. Most looked like regular typefaces you could see in any city, which I was a little disappointed by. But some buildings still kept the old, 1900s style serif typography and I loved it.

 

One thing I’ve loved in each place I’ve been is how each sign has been for something different- a restaurant, a hotel, a letter box. Yet, the letters from each location fit with each other. The type from Paris, whether modern or not, looks like the rest of the type from Paris. They all create the mood of the city, and that’s been my absolute favorite part so far.

I’ve been photographing and collecting images of type through all of my travels. I’m not sure yet what I’m going to do with it, but I want to do something with it, whether use it as inspiration in further work or do an independent project with it. But one thing’s for sure- it has definitely been a way to express my love for design while I’m not actively working in it.

From Tourist to Tour Guide

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This past week, I was lucky enough to have family visit me in Rome again! This time I was spending the week with my mom and step dad. When my brother visited me earlier in the semester, I will still very new to Rome so I was not as familiar with the city. However, by the time my mom and step dad came here, I had already been living in Rome for almost three months (how did that happen so quickly?). While I might not be able to consider myself a local, I certainly don’t consider myself the average tourist anymore. It was my turn to be the tour guide.

On the first night they arrived, we walked to almost all of the major attractions Rome has to offer. I showed them Piazza del Popolo, the Spanish Steps, the Pantheon, and the Trevi Fountain. Obviously, we had to get some gelato on the first night after all that walking, but that didn’t stop us from getting gelato every other night too.

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Fortunately, the excitement of being in Rome seemed to outweigh the jet lag, and they were both ready to explore all week. We spent our first weekend exploring Florence, which was absolutely stunning! When we got back to Rome and I had to return to class, it didn’t stop them from exploring on their own during the day. On our first evening back in Rome, we tried out some new bars that I hadn’t been to before and wandered around the neighborhood of Trastevere. We found some great spots that I will definitely go back to! Then we went out for a classic Roman aperitivo. We went to my favorite spot for aperitivo, Freni e Frizioni, where they have a huge spread of unlimited great food and a drink included, all for just 8 euro! Italians know how to do happy hour right.

Another night, we went to the nearby supermarket to buy some food and I cooked a dinner for the three of us, which would basically never happen in the States. I made salad with an olive oil and senape dressing, fettuccine pasta with tomato and basil sauce, and garlic sausage. If I do say so myself, it was a pretty great dinner. Rome might just make a cook out of me after all.

The next day, my mom and step dad took a day trip to Venice. Venice has been a place on my step dad’s bucket list and I assured them that it was worth the train ride. They fell in love with the city of canals and raved about it when they got back to Rome.

Our last day together in Rome, we took a trip to Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini. Under this erie church you can find a crypt filled with the bones from thousands of friars. However, these aren’t just any old piles of bones. Each room has a special design on the walls and ceilings made entirely of bones. Even the chandeliers are made of bones. They say the designer had a special eye, but I think he was probably just insane. Although, you can’t deny his work is interesting to look at. Then we did a bit of shopping and my mom was able to find an awesome leather bag. Finally, we got dinner at one of my favorite restaurants in Rome before heading home.

It was great to have my family here in Rome and I am so glad that I got to share at least a small piece of my experience with them.

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I’m Here to Do What? (Putting the Study in Study Abroad)

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It’s pretty easy to think you’re on vacation in Rome. 

Actually, most of the time, I am on vacation. Every weekend is a new city, new culture, new experience. Since the my third week in Italy, I have travelled on every weekend, jetting off Friday morning and landing back Sunday night, only to repeat the process again the next Friday to a new place. Italy’s proximity to so much of Europe has made realizing all my world traveling dreams so, so simple. 

But as easy as it is to fall into that jet-set lifestyle, it’s also easy to forget the real reason why I’m in Rome. And this week, I came plummeting down to Earth with one hell of a wake-up call:

Midterm week.

I know, I know. You’re reading this and going- “you think you’ve got it bad? I have ten exams all at the same time and a twenty page paper! And I’m not in Italy!” Or maybe you’re thinking “you think you’ve got it bad? I have a job-” to which I say, okay, you win. You’ve got the worst gig ever, and I’m sorry.

But still- there’s something about the sheer panic of exams that can take the fun out of just about everything, even Rome. I didn’t even have exams and I was freaking out. It was just…in the air.

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When you’re on vacation and suddenly remember you’re meant to be studying

Now that the frenzy of midterms is well and over, and I’ve had some time to recover, I’ve been able to do a bit of reflecting (big surprise) on why I’m here in the first place. And I’ve begun to realize that school was never really the priority.

Er, sorry mom.

Maybe it has to do with the fact that I’m only in four classes- none of which have anything to do with my major back in Philly. Maybe it’s because I’m only in class a few hours out of the week. Or maybe (ahem, probably), its because I wasn’t coming here to go to school in the first place.

Thinking back to every single essay I wrote on all those applications back in the fall, the idea of attending classes was never brought up unless the prompt demanded it. I wanted to go to Rome to expand my horizons, strengthen my Italian skills, break out of my comfort zone… and oh yeah, go take some classes and stuff. Not that I wasn’t excited for the immersive learning experience that is studying art and language in a foreign country, I just didn’t even think of it.

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Was honestly more excited for all the photo-ops than I was for school

Yeah, yeah, I know. It’s a study abroad. It’s in the name. Don’t really have an excuse for that one.

So, needless to say, the first mention of a midterm was like someone pouring ice down the back of my shirt- far too startling. And I was one of the lucky ones. My midterms were at-home essays and sketchbook critiques.

Still, it’s shocking to remember you’re actually at school. That’s not necessarily a very good thing to forget. It’s like how sometimes you’re going somewhere completely on autopilot, and then come to and realize you’re standing in your kitchen without any memory of actually walking there. You’re aware of where you are and how you must have gotten there, but it’s alarming to realize you did it without noticing.

So my advice, if you’re reading this and considering a study abroad: it is, above all other things, going to school. The first few weeks may seem like super fun awesome vacation time, but you don’t want to come to at midterm week and realize you’ve been going through school without noticing. Also, you are still paying to go to college. Might as well actually get your money’s worth at the absolute very least.

And, really, being able to go to school in a foreign country is an incredible experience. You get incredible cultural experiences, insights, and trips that you wouldn’t get through even the best of tour guides. You learn from people who live and breathe the city you’re in and the subject you’re studying. I’ve been able to see live Italian theatre, have a wine tasting with a sommelier, see a documentary screening with the actual director of the film, visit small Etruscan villages and see ancient temples buried beneath churches.

And if I have to sit in a lecture for a few hours four days a week for these experiences, then I’m going to. And I’ll even take some midterms if I must.

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I can never escape Temple, even in London.

 

A Surprise Around Every Corner

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One of the things you quickly discover when you come to Rome is that there is history everywhere you turn. I am always unexpectedly running into new works of art, monuments, and churches. It seems that there is an exciting ancient story around every corner of this city. Although I am more familiar with the city now and know my way around, I still do not mind wandering and getting a bit lost in Rome because it doesn’t take long to discover something new. Even after living here for two months, there is still so much of the city I have left to see.

Even my first time seeing the Vatican was a surprise. I actually live in an apartment right next to the Vatican. I can look around the corner of my building and see the huge wall of the small city. Yet, somehow I did not actually see inside these walls until I had lived in Rome for a few weeks. To tell the truth, I was coming home from a night out with friends and it was probably around 3am when, seemingly out of nowhere, the entrance to the Vatican was right in front of me. It all felt so surreal. How did I just accidentally stumble upon the Vatican? Do I actually get to live here for four months? I hope Pope Francis is sleeping well while I walk home in the middle of the night.

On another night, I had a similar feeling as I sat outside sipping my drink and enjoying a view of the Colosseum. The bar I was at, Coming Out, is right beside the Colosseum and offers an incredible view of the ancient stadium. Coming Out is also one of the few LGBT+ bars in Rome and it felt very good to be surrounded by my community abroad and to meet Italians and others who identify as LGBT+. While Rome does not exactly have a “Gayborhood” like Philadelphia, and it not the most progressive city when it comes to LGBT+ matters, it is comforting to know that the LGBT+ community does exist in Rome (and has some of the coolest bars in Rome with views like this one).

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Since then, I have had the opportunity to meet more people in Rome’s LGBT+ community and explore many of the LGBT+ hang out spots in Rome. If you are looking to dance in Rome, we also have the best spots to dance. Just sayin’.

Rome surprised me once again when I discovered that just around the corner from this bar and the Colosseum is the Basilica of San Clemente. This is one of my favorite basilicas in Rome because not only is it stunning inside, but you can also explore unground beneath the church. The Basilica of San Clemente is actually built on top of the ruins of two previous churches. Beneath the basilica you can find the remains of columns, artworks, and even a water system that still runs today. The city of Rome was literally built from the ground up. Throughout history they continued building on top of older structures and the city continued to be raised. You can see just how much the city has been raised up from its original ground level if you visit the Basilica of San Clemente.

These are just a few of my favorite surprise spots that I have come across while in Rome. The list goes on and on and I’m sure it will continue to grow, which is why I plan to continue getting lost in this gorgeous city until I find every hidden gem.

Coming “Home” from Spring Break

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I have never been so thrilled to finish midterms before in my life as I was this semester. On Temple’s main campus, I do not typically have an actual “midterm week”. Usually, my midterms are more spread out or consist of performances or projects rather than just large exams. However, at Temple Rome I had to spend countless hours studying for exams the week before midterms and I will admit it was very stressful. However, it was all worth it the second I walked out of my last midterm. Freedom at last! It was time to embark on the adventure of a lifetime. I went straight from my midterm to the airport. My roommate came with me and actually almost didn’t make it, but the spring break gods were on our side. This spring break was one of the most unforgettable weeks of my life. I was so lucky to be able to travel with an incredible group of people and experience three different cities in 12 days. We traveled to Barcelona and Seville in Spain and then to Lisbon, Portugal, and finally back to Rome. We made so many memories that I will always cherish and met beautiful souls from across the globe. It truly felt like a dream. Whether we were climbing a mountain in Barcelona, riding bikes through the small city of Seville, or swimming in the ocean on the coast of Portugal, it was completely enchanting.

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Riding bike through Seville

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Enjoying the beach in Portugal

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On top of a mountain in Barcelona

As amazing as spring break was and although I was sad for it to end, it did feel good coming “home” to Rome. Even after just two short months living in Rome, it has already become like a second home. I especially appreciate it after traveling to other cities that are totally unfamiliar to me. It felt right to come back to a city that I feel like I know well. In Rome, I know how to get around and I walk the same familiar streets for my daily commute. I know where to get the best gelato and I have my favorite spot for aperitivo. I know the history of Rome now and have more of a grasp on the Italian language. I know where to go if I want to dance or if I want to have a quiet relaxing evening. It has taken some time, but I have adjusted to life in Rome and I would not trade it for any other city in the world. I am definitely falling in love with Rome and it is hard to believe that my time here is half way over. I am just going to keep pretending like I never have to leave, but since I do eventually have to leave, I am going to make the most out of my last two months here in Rome. I look forward to new discoveries and experiences as I continue to get to know the eternal city.

A Cactus in Rome

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There are cactuses in Rome. They pop up every so often; giant flat paddle-shaped branches coated in spikes marring the lush green landscape surrounding the city. You’ll see them in passing as you rush by, growing out of place in some garden, in someone’s yard, giving it little more than the passing thought of “huh- that’s strange.”

I am the cactus.

Not literally, as I hope would be obvious, but metaphorically. Us American students are the cactuses of Rome- these funny little out-of-place things that are just…there. There’s no issue, but there’s also no getting rid of us. And try as we might, we’re never going to quite fit in with Rome. But that’s okay- we’re going to stick around anyway.

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I tried to get a good photo of some cacti from a train (didn’t work) so I found one on Cactiguide.com (source: https://cactiguide.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=15493) I also found from that article that these cacti are an invasive species, and a massive nuisance. I think there’s a metaphor in that, too…

If you read one of my first posts about being an American abroad, you’ll know that one thing I’ve had difficulty with is the feeling of “otherness” that hangs over my head, subtle as a neon sign. That I am not Italian, not Roman, and as hard as I try I’m not going to be. Not in the few months I have here. 

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Real Italians definitely are so pale they reflect sunlight, and they all take dorky photos in front of classic art

But now, I’ve reached the halfway point of my stay here. And I’m starting to get a little more comfortable with that “otherness.” I’m not Roman. But I do go to school in Rome. I eat in Rome, I drink in Rome, I sleep in Rome. Like the cactus, I may not look like I belong here, but it’s where I am. It’s where I live. 

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I still can’t believe I get to see this (almost) every day

I’m embracing my cactus-ness. (My cactus-ivity?) I’m American! So what? If I’m going to have that stigma over my head, I may as well take advantage of it. I’m going to take as many photos, do as many typical tourist things as I can. I’m already seen as an outsider, may as well get away with it while I can.

This spring break has also afforded me a bit of time to reflect on some of the incredible experiences I’ve been able to have while abroad. I know it’s a very cliche thing to talk about when travelling- how its “totally changed my life.” But it has, in ways. I’ve done things I wouldn’t have done otherwise (like gotten a tour of the Vatican Museums by a brother in the seminary), and met people outside of my little advertising bubble I wouldn’t have met on Temple’s main campus. 

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Our Vatican tour group, taken by our incredible tour guide

One thing I always mentioned before coming to Italy, in just about every application that asked “what do you want to gain from studying abroad?”, was that I wanted to step out of my comfort zone in Rome. I’ve made a lot of progress in the last year with my anxiety- I don’t get as nervous in crowds anymore, I find talking to strangers (and even not strangers!) a little easier, and little slip-ups don’t embarrass me half as much as they used to. So I was pretty nervous about the dramatic change in surroundings- what if I completely regressed and became a shy, nervous mess again? My biggest goal was to keep pushing, to not get complacent and to keep pushing myself. Get out there! This is a once in a lifetime experience!

So while this trip hasn’t been entirely anxiety-free (as I’m sure is also completely obvious), it’s not been a wreck. I’ve found myself talking to new people, actually trying new things. I ran around like a loon with a camera for several hours and only felt weird about it for half that time! I’ve reached out to people I only barely knew, and ended up making some great friends from it.

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The G(r)eek Squad! I ended up on this trip to Athens by responding to a post on the Temple Rome Facebook group- something I don’t think I would have done last year. And I’m really glad I did, I loved Athens and had an awesome time.

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Also went to Barcelona on a whim, thanks to a friend-of-a-friend situation (we were pretty bad at group pictures), another thing I don’t think I would have done this time last year.

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And through the people from Barcelona, I got invited to go to Paris! There’s something to this whole “making friends” thing, isn’t there.

For the rest of my time in Rome, I’d like to keep doing that. My continuing goals are to get better at Italian, as I still find myself reverting to English almost immediately after “Ciao!”, and to continue to build friendships with people. While I know these things are meant to be organic, they can take a lot of effort for me. But I’m not about to let a little work stop me. Like the Roman cactuses, I may be a bit strange, but I’m here to stay.

Working from Rome

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Easy as it may seem, taking photos is my…job, of sorts, while in Rome. I take photographs for many things. I need them for this blog, I need them to fulfill my role as an Overseas Ambassador with Diversity Abroad, and sometimes, I get tasked with photographing events for Temple Rome.

Last week was my first time being the photographer for a Temple event. My job was to capture the Wine Tasting Night- get students participating in the event to later share on social media.

I’ll be honest, it was a little intimidating. I’m a quiet person, the idea of running around and shoving my camera in people’s faces didn’t seem ideal. I hate getting in the way, and sometimes it seems like the photographer’s job is to get in the way. It’s how you get that perfect shot, right?

So nerves aside, I grabbed my camera and set to work– by standing awkwardly in the back.

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Picture me, hiding in the last row of seats and totally out of view. That’s where this photo came from.

The wine night began with a presentation from a sommelier. She came prepared with a PowerPoint, video clips, and speech. This was a legit event, and it was packed. I felt so strange, running up and down the aisle while someone was clearly speaking. I have manners, I know it’s impolite to disrupt someone when people need to be paying attention to them. 

Eventually, after many assurances I would not be in the way and being publicly named as the photographer, I got over myself and actually got to work.

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A toast, before we begin

And it was actually…pretty fun. Turns out, people just like having their photo taken. People would see the camera, and immediately pose and smile. Everyone was having a good time, and clearly didn’t mind me capturing that.

And the event itself was pretty fun, too. I was lucky, as I got a free ticket in (and a pretty nice wine glass) as the photographer. The sommelier taught us what wine should look, smell, and taste like, and how to test those things.

We all learned about the process of making wine, what really makes white and red wine different (aside from color), and how to pair food with wine. Did you know pizza goes best with white wine? (I didn’t). 

And of course, everyone got to drink some (the best part of the night for everyone involved, I think). 

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Drinking on the job

So despite my initial fears, photographing the wine night actually went pretty well. (I think, somewhere in there, is a metaphor for my entire semester here) I felt like part of a weird little wine-drinking community, where I was the overzealous soccer mom trying to capture every last moment. Strange, but hey, at least I was a part of it.

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Group photo!

Museum Madness

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Two weeks ago, I wrote about art in Rome. But there was a definite focus on modern and street art. It was the very first thing I noticed as our shuttle was driving us to our new home for the semester, and it continues to be something I pay attention to every day.

However, I did feel like my last blog leaned a little too heavy on the street art. I mentioned museums, but I’m also pretty sure that mention was to say that they could, occasionally, be pretty boring.

I don’t think that was very fair to museums.

Truly, I love them. One of my favorite ways to spend a day, whether in Philly or in New York, is at a museum. The PMA, the Penn, the Met, the MoMA. Name it, I’ve been to it, and loved it.

And I’ve been doing the same here. Either in class or on my own, I try to go to at least one a week. This past week, I’ve seen the Villa Farnesina in Trastevere, an entire sixteenth century villa decked out in murals and frescoes of ancient myths;

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The ceiling in one of the rooms at Villa Farnesina, depicting all of the gods at Cupid and Psyche’s wedding.

the Accademia di San Luca, a Roman academy dedicated to “elevating” the work of its artists;

and the Acropolis Museum in Athens (after, of course, the Acropolis itself).

The week before, it was the Palazzo Breschi, to see some incredible works by Artemesia Gentilleschi. Before that- the Picasso Museum in Barcelona. And the Edward Hopper exhibit at the Vittoriano. Even before that, the Palazzo Massimo museum to examine statues of ancient Greek gods and learn what attributes define which gods. 

I’ve definitely been in museum heaven.

Though, sometimes it feels like its too much. Art can get really overwhelming, at least to someone like me who has been invested in it for so long. Each museum has hundreds, if not thousands of pieces. Thousands of hours of work; millions of brushstrokes, sketch marks, carefully sculpted shapes. To be surrounded by that much work is so incredible, it’s almost impossible to accurately feel it. And when you can’t feel it, you start to get…tired. One minute you’re in awe of the incredible Renaissance art in front of you, the next you’re wondering how much a panino from that place you passed earlier would be, and if you have enough time to grab one before your next class.

It’s been a bit frustrating to deal with, to say the least. I am (or, was) an artist! This is my forte! Why am I bored looking at these incredible paintings?

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Very bored to finally be seeing a Botticelli in person

Well I think I’ve figured it out- Museum Madness (Note: this is not real and I completely made it up about twenty minutes ago. But hear me out). It’s kind of the same way a kid goes nuts on Halloween and eats all their candy only to puke it all up later. You visit somewhere that, like Rome, is rich in art and history and are completely overcome with the need to see all of it. So you do- you see the Vatican and the ruins and the museums and the paintings and next thing you know you’re confusing Michelangelo and Raphael (sacrilegious, I know). It’s an over-saturation of art. Because let’s be real, there’s only so many paintings you can stare at before your feet start wondering if you could at least sit if you insist on doing this every other day.

Some people in Rome, myself included, have definitely gone overboard on the museums. (Some have had similar phenomena happen with Italian wine….or pasta). I’m getting excited for warmer weather, when botanical gardens and lush parks will become a more reasonable way to spend an afternoon.

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The Borghese Gardens- too cold now, but will be perfect come spring

Because while I love a good museum day, I need some alternatives. Otherwise….madness.

Falling for Florence

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I’ll admit it- my first impression of Rome was not the greatest.

I  was fresh off of a flight, tired, and cranky. The first thing I saw was not the beautiful cobblestone streets and architecture of my dreams, it was a man almost getting hit by a bus. Our taxi to the residence pulled up next to a dumpster, and our driver opened the door into oncoming traffic. I felt tricked. This is the city I’ve been dying to come to? It’s….gross! I felt a bit ashamed for being so quick to judge, but in my defense, long-haul flights are not fun. I probably would have said a private beach in Hawaii was ugly if it meant getting to my room and to sleep any faster.

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Yeah, I was too tired to appreciate this. Crazy.

Me and Rome have been getting along much better lately. The graffiti is interesting, the traffic is manageable, even the trash just begins to remind me of home. (To clarify- I don’t live in a dumpster. I live near New York, another city lots of people think is gross and dirty. It is, but I still love it.) I figured, if I could like it at home, I could like it here. But it’s taken me a while to get to this point.

Me and Florence, however, is a different story. From the first second-I loved Florence. There was something so vibrant about it, even at 10am on a weekday. There weren’t mobs of people, just light crowds, the faint smell of pastries (and leather. so much leather), and gorgeous open squares.

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Being a dork in front of the Cathedral di Santa Maria. Hey, when in….Florence?

The first thing we did was take a quick walk around the Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore- yes, the one with Brunelleschi’s Duomo. Just from the outside, it is stunning. The patterns of alternating green and white marble are striking, and it makes for quite the sight when you catch a glimpse down the street. Our tickets to climb the dome were not until the next morning, however, so we had to find something else to do.

We headed over to the Uffizi Gallery, where we happened to meet up with some other Temple students we knew- we’re literally everywhere. We decided to head in together, and we spent the day looking at all the incredible art the Uffizi has to offer. Botticelli, DaVinci, Caravaggio, Gentileschi, Bosch, Titian, Raphael.

It was so crazy to see some of this work that I remember learning about in high school right in front of me. It makes me want to send a postcard to my high school art history teacher- Hey! Remember me? I’m seeing all that stuff you told us about! It was also fun to put some of my new knowledge of Greek statues from my Mythology class to good use, pointing out how to tell which gods statues are of. Like, if there’s a snake, its probably Apollo. And upper arm bracelets symbolized beauty, so if the statue is wearing one, it’s probably of Aphrodite.

We spent the rest of the evening around the Ponte Vecchio, and then took a walk through the Boboli Gardens, which offer a beautiful view of the city.

The next day, both me and my friend woke up super early to go climb Il Duomo. It’s four hundred steps to the top, and every single one is torture. I’m sure if you exercise regularly, each stair is like a marshmallow cloud pillow, but I do not, and it sucked. I did fine until about halfway up, then it started feeling like I would be climbing stairs for the rest of my life, because they did not end. Only after two breaks and countless complaints of “these stairs are actually going to kill me.”, did we reach this sight:

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Giotto’s Bell Tower! We were going to climb this too, but decided not too after nearly dying halfway up the Duomo.

There’s not really words for it, but it was incredible. I could have stayed up there all day, and that’s not just because the spiral staircase was terrifying and my legs hurt.

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This is the face of someone whose legs are ready to abandon their body and just leave forever. Also of someone realizing how high up off the ground she is.

We took one last pit stop before leaving to go see Michelangelo’s David at the Galleria Accademia. It’s huge. Seriously, the thing is massive. I’ve been told it’s big, but I’m 4’11”. Everything is huge to me. But I couldn’t get over the size of it, and how something so large can still seem so life like. It seemed like the perfect way to wrap up our trip.

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So weird to see this in real life- it never actually seemed like something I would be able to do.

One thing I love about Temple Rome so far is how they encourage us to explore on our weekends, and how easy it is to do so. Our trip was very last minute, we only decided a day before leaving to actually go. But it was still an easy trip, and we were in Florence in a few hours. If you travel a few hours outside of Philadelphia, all you’ll end up in is a cornfield in the middle of Amish Country. Here, we were able to get to the center of the Renaissance in a morning. And it felt so incredible to be able to apply the stuff from my courses to my museum trips, it makes it feel so much more real. I’ve been really excited to get around, and my professors have only been encouraging about it. They ask us about our plans and give us advice and recommendations. It’s nice to have a system at school that understands our desires to travel, and supports it rather than ignoring it. I feel like I’m in an environment that really fosters curiosity, and it makes my studies easier. It’s something that compliments my travelling, rather than impeding it. Temple has been fantastic so far for stressing the fact that we are global students, rather than just temporary Italian ones.

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We are incredible together“- me and Florence, me and Temple Rome