Category Archives: Nick Brown

Buona Pasqua!

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     Spending La Pasqua (a.k.a. Easter) in Rome when I live literally right outside of the Vatican City walls is a unique experience. Thousands of people travel to Rome for La Pasqua from all over world, especially to see the Pope give Sunday mass. In fact, so many people come to see the Pope that you actually have to get tickets in order to go. I decided not to get tickets in order to avoid the crazy crowds, plus I can practically see the Pope out of my back window anyways. However, you are able to watch the Pope live on television during Easter mass.

     There are a few Italian traditions during Easter that differ from those in the states. While we usually have marshmallow peeps, big chocolate Easter bunnies, and (my personal favorite) peanut butter eggs, these are not typical in Italy. One of the main Italian traditions is giving a huge, hollow chocolate egg that holds some sort of small gift inside. It reminds me of our easter egg hunts with little candies inside but on a bigger scale. Another Italian classic for La Pasqua is a traditional cake called a Colomba. This cake is shaped like a dove and very simple, but absolutely delicious! My italian class shared a colomba to celebrate the holiday.

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Colomba

     Spending a major holiday away from your family can be hard and I definitely missed seeing all of my family and having our usual big Easter meal this year, but I am very lucky that I have found a new family of friends here in Rome to celebrate with. My roommate and I hosted a huge Pasqua Brunch Extravaganza at our apartment with all of our closest friends. Just like the Italians, we used food to bring us together, but just like Americans, we wanted a huge, real brunch, not just a cornetto and caffè. Together we cooked sausages, potatoes with some vegetables, french toast, and homemade simple syrup. We even made mimosas with some freshly squeezed orange juice and Italian prosecco. The Pasqua Brunch Extravaganza was a success and I would not have spent it any other way.

     The day after Easter, a lot of the city is still shut down. Many businesses and all of the schools are still closed and it is typical to see people outside and enjoying the day off to relax. We decided to take a trip to see the Giardino Degli Aranci, or the Garden of Oranges, in Rome. It is a small garden, but a beautiful one. It is surrounded by a tall, brick wall and filled with orange trees. You can actually smell the orange in the air when you are in the garden. The garden is also on top of a hill and has a beautiful view over the city. The weather was perfect so we packed a lunch and had a picnic in the garden. All in all, it was a flawless holiday weekend and I was happy to spend it in Rome so I could soak up every ounce of this city before I leave in just two weeks.

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Giardino Degli Aranci

 

Going Back to High School

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     One of the biggest highlights for me this semester in Rome was getting the opportunity to volunteer as an English tutor at a local Italian high school. I spent one hour each week with a classroom of 25 fourteen to fifteen-year-old students on Monday mornings. You can imagine that trying to keep control of a large group of loud teenagers can be a bit overwhelming. I still remember my first day, three months ago, and how nervous I was. I had absolutely no experience as an English tutor. What if I look like a fool and don’t know what I’m doing? What if the Italian students don’t like me? What if they don’t speak English well and we can’t communicate? What if the professor I’m working with is intimidating? All of these fears went away almost immediately once I went to my first class.

     The professor I was working with was incredibly kind, welcoming, and helpful. She gave me plenty of freedom to structure my time with the students however I wanted and would give me suggestions for lessons if I ever needed any. The students were also incredibly friendly and as excited to meet me as I was to meet them. On the first day, I did a short “getting to know you” activity with the students in order to find out their interests, what they want to learn from me, and assess their level. I was surprised to discover that even though I had the youngest age group of the high school, they still spoke English very well. Some students were more vocal than others, but all of them were able to hold a conversation with me. My main goal was just to get the students excited about speaking English and to practice with a native speaker.

     Tutoring in a foreign country with a group of young teenagers did present some challenges. Italian high schools are set up differently than in the States, so it is actually the teachers who have to move from room to room in between every class and the students all stick together in the same room for the whole day. This results in two consequences: the students form their own strong packs and become incredibly antsy being cooped up in one room all day. I can’t say I blame them. I know I may have been chatty in class as a fourteen-year-old, but I swear these Italian teens could out-chat any American classroom. However, I was up for the challenge and ready to demand the class’ attention with the only way I knew how: make it fun!

     The students, like myself, were most interested in talking about cultural differences between Italy and America so I came up with some new activities and games each week to discuss these. One week I brought in a speaker and we listened to some American music and even danced a bit. We discussed the lyrics and any words they didn’t understand. Of course, I had to throw in some musical theatre, so I played them a song from Hamilton. This ended up being my favorite song with them because not only did the language used in the music and rap style challenge them, I also was able to share with them some American history and my passion for musical theatre. Some other activities we did included a spelling competition, grammar auction, American slang, and a discussion all about food. The students got very competitive when we played games, especially when they knew there was a prize on the line so I liked to bring in some chocolate or treats to bribe them into really engaging in the lesson that day. I have to say, it was effective.

     I can honestly say I loved spending an hour a week with these kids and usually it didn’t feel like enough time. My class continually impressed me and I loved getting to know them more each week. It was so interesting learning about our similarities and differences and they still like to make fun of me for eating “everything pizza”. Unfortunately, I had my last class with my students this past week and I was more sad than I expected. I am definitely going to miss seeing them each week and I am hopeful that they will retain at least some of what I thought them even though I think they may have taught me more than I taught them.

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A Weekend in Paradise

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This past weekend was possibly the most magical weekend of my life. I took a trip to the Amalfi Coast (about a 3 hour bus ride south of Rome) with 21 other Temple Rome students. You could definitely say that it was a Temple takeover on the Italian coast. This is the only trip I have taken this semester with such a large group, but this was definitely the place to do it. On Thursday night we left Rome for the charming town of Sorrento. We stayed in bugalows surrounded by beautiful lemon and orange trees. It felt like we were camping together in a tropical paradise and we nicknamed our little neighborhood of cabins “Bungalow City”. The next morning, we left bright and early for Positano. We took a bus that drove for about 30 minutes on a winding road on the side of a cliff. Even though I occasionally feared that our bus would topple off of the edge of the cliff into the Mediterranean, it was well worth the views. Once we arrived, we had a long trek down the side of the mountain to reach the beach. My legs were literally shaking from the long walk, but I forgot about it as soon as we stepped onto the beach. It was a black rocky beach with incredible views. You could see the stunning blue sea on the one side and the many houses built into the side of the cliff on the other. We spent the day relaxing on the beach and I bought possibly the best panino I have ever eaten for lunch. Then we took the bus back to Sorrento to shower and freshen up before dinner. For dinner, we all went out to a restaurant for a multi-course meal. The meal included bread, wine, two courses of pasta and two different types of pizza. Then we went out to experience the night life in Sorrento.

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Beautiful Positano

The next day was my favorite part of the weekend. We took a ferry from Sorrento to the picturesque island of Capri, where we took a short hike to see some views of the island and the sea. Then we took a three hour cruise on a smaller boat around the entire island. It was just us on the boat and we were even able to bring along our own food and drinks. It was the boat ride of a life time. At one point, the boat driver stopped the boat for us to jump off and swim in the water for a little while. I gladly cannonballed into the sea and was quickly shocked by the cold water. It may have been very hot outside but the water itself was still pretty cold since it’s only the beginning of April. I didn’t mind the cold at all. The view of the crystal clear water and the beautiful island kept me distracted.

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We got back on the larger boat and rode a bit further until we came to the Blue Grotto. The Blue Grotto is one of the natural wonders of Italy. It is a small cave in the side of the island of Capri. The entrance to the cave is very small and you can only enter it by tiny rowboats, which only allows for four people on each boat. Once we got on the rowboat, we had to lay flat to avoid hitting our heads on the cave wall as we entered. Once inside the cave, we could sit up and it became clear why the Blue Grotto got its name. The sunlight shines in through the small entrance and makes the water in the cave glow a bright blue. It looked like something from a fantasy movie or like we entered the blue world of James Cameron’s Avatar. I dipped my hands in the water and watched in awe as they glowed blue. The man rowing the boat even sang and his voice echoed through the cave. We could only stay in the cave for a short time and then had to return to our boat and head back onto the island.

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Inside the Blue Grotto

The last day we went to Pompeii and toured the famous city. We toured the theatre district of the ancient city and saw some bodies preserved by the ashes from Mt. Vesuvius. We had a great view of the infamous volcano and explored the ruins. Finally we had to return to Sorrento to catch our bus back to Rome.

I never wanted our magical weekend on the Amalfi Coast to end, but then again, it wasn’t too hard to leave knowing I got to return to my favorite Italian city: Roma.

 

From Tourist to Tour Guide

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This past week, I was lucky enough to have family visit me in Rome again! This time I was spending the week with my mom and step dad. When my brother visited me earlier in the semester, I will still very new to Rome so I was not as familiar with the city. However, by the time my mom and step dad came here, I had already been living in Rome for almost three months (how did that happen so quickly?). While I might not be able to consider myself a local, I certainly don’t consider myself the average tourist anymore. It was my turn to be the tour guide.

On the first night they arrived, we walked to almost all of the major attractions Rome has to offer. I showed them Piazza del Popolo, the Spanish Steps, the Pantheon, and the Trevi Fountain. Obviously, we had to get some gelato on the first night after all that walking, but that didn’t stop us from getting gelato every other night too.

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Fortunately, the excitement of being in Rome seemed to outweigh the jet lag, and they were both ready to explore all week. We spent our first weekend exploring Florence, which was absolutely stunning! When we got back to Rome and I had to return to class, it didn’t stop them from exploring on their own during the day. On our first evening back in Rome, we tried out some new bars that I hadn’t been to before and wandered around the neighborhood of Trastevere. We found some great spots that I will definitely go back to! Then we went out for a classic Roman aperitivo. We went to my favorite spot for aperitivo, Freni e Frizioni, where they have a huge spread of unlimited great food and a drink included, all for just 8 euro! Italians know how to do happy hour right.

Another night, we went to the nearby supermarket to buy some food and I cooked a dinner for the three of us, which would basically never happen in the States. I made salad with an olive oil and senape dressing, fettuccine pasta with tomato and basil sauce, and garlic sausage. If I do say so myself, it was a pretty great dinner. Rome might just make a cook out of me after all.

The next day, my mom and step dad took a day trip to Venice. Venice has been a place on my step dad’s bucket list and I assured them that it was worth the train ride. They fell in love with the city of canals and raved about it when they got back to Rome.

Our last day together in Rome, we took a trip to Santa Maria della Concezione dei Cappuccini. Under this erie church you can find a crypt filled with the bones from thousands of friars. However, these aren’t just any old piles of bones. Each room has a special design on the walls and ceilings made entirely of bones. Even the chandeliers are made of bones. They say the designer had a special eye, but I think he was probably just insane. Although, you can’t deny his work is interesting to look at. Then we did a bit of shopping and my mom was able to find an awesome leather bag. Finally, we got dinner at one of my favorite restaurants in Rome before heading home.

It was great to have my family here in Rome and I am so glad that I got to share at least a small piece of my experience with them.

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Finding Friends and Family in Firenze

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This past weekend, I finally made it to the gorgeous city of Firenze (a.k.a. Florence)! Traveling to Florence was almost too easy. Take just a short hour and a half train ride from Rome and you will find yourself in this beautiful center of the Renaissance. I was especially excited to explore Florence because I would get to do it with my mom and step dad who are visiting me in Italy for the week. While I love showing them my favorite spots in my temporary home city, taking a weekend trip to Florence gave us the opportunity to discover a new city together and Firenze did not disappoint!

After we arrived on the train, we grabbed the typical Italian breakfast of a caffe and cornetto and then headed straight to see the famous Duomo. It was even bigger than I imagined! Everyone was gathering in the main piazza to take a look at the incredible structure. Once we were able to stop staring at the Duomo, we went to check out Florence’s famous leather market and buy some genuine Italian leather products. With some time to spare before lunch, we went to the Galleria Dell’Accademia, where we saw Michelangelo’s David statue. I was anticipating a life-sized David and was surprised to discover that he was much larger!

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As if my time in Florence could not get any better, I got to meet up with a group of my best friends from Temple main campus. A group of my fellow musical theatre majors are studying abroad in London for the semester and we knew we had to see each other while we are in Europe. As it turns out, we all planned a trip to Florence for the same weekend without even trying! It was the perfect happy accident. As my family and I went to meet my friends for a delicious pizza lunch, I couldn’t contain my excitement. Walking through the door of that restaurant was like walking into Philly style to meet up with friends back at home (and yet, it wasn’t like that at all). I felt like my worlds were colliding. I was still in Italy, the country I have grown to love over the past two and a half months, but I was completely surrounded by my closest family and friends from the States. I only had one day to spend with my friends before they had to head back to London, which wasn’t nearly enough time to catch up on all of our experiences abroad, but we made the most out of every second of our time.

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Of course, we had to get some gelato together. Then we went to the Piazzale Michelangelo, where there are breathtaking views of all of Florence. We bought some wine at a nearby stand, cracked it open, and sat on the steps to fill each other in on our lives while soaking up Firenze. Finally, we went to grab some classic Italian cuisine together for dinner, explored some of the local bars, and even had drinks made by an Albert Einstein look alike. I can’t even express how happy I was to be reunited with my friends and show them a piece of Italy. I was glad I could show them some Italian culture and give them a bit of an inside scoop, even though I may not be the expert on Florence. I was sad to say goodbye to them, but I knew that we would see each other again in a few weeks and we both had so much more left to experience in our own study abroad programs.

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As I spent the rest of my time with my mom and step dad, we climbed 414 steps to the top of the bell tower where we could get 360 degree panoramic views of the city. Then we went to wander through the enormous and scenic Boboli Gardens. Finally, we topped it off with a mouth watering pasta meal before heading back to Rome.

I could not have asked for a more perfect weekend: a stunning city, family, and the friend reunion of a lifetime. My heart is full.

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A Surprise Around Every Corner

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One of the things you quickly discover when you come to Rome is that there is history everywhere you turn. I am always unexpectedly running into new works of art, monuments, and churches. It seems that there is an exciting ancient story around every corner of this city. Although I am more familiar with the city now and know my way around, I still do not mind wandering and getting a bit lost in Rome because it doesn’t take long to discover something new. Even after living here for two months, there is still so much of the city I have left to see.

Even my first time seeing the Vatican was a surprise. I actually live in an apartment right next to the Vatican. I can look around the corner of my building and see the huge wall of the small city. Yet, somehow I did not actually see inside these walls until I had lived in Rome for a few weeks. To tell the truth, I was coming home from a night out with friends and it was probably around 3am when, seemingly out of nowhere, the entrance to the Vatican was right in front of me. It all felt so surreal. How did I just accidentally stumble upon the Vatican? Do I actually get to live here for four months? I hope Pope Francis is sleeping well while I walk home in the middle of the night.

On another night, I had a similar feeling as I sat outside sipping my drink and enjoying a view of the Colosseum. The bar I was at, Coming Out, is right beside the Colosseum and offers an incredible view of the ancient stadium. Coming Out is also one of the few LGBT+ bars in Rome and it felt very good to be surrounded by my community abroad and to meet Italians and others who identify as LGBT+. While Rome does not exactly have a “Gayborhood” like Philadelphia, and it not the most progressive city when it comes to LGBT+ matters, it is comforting to know that the LGBT+ community does exist in Rome (and has some of the coolest bars in Rome with views like this one).

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Since then, I have had the opportunity to meet more people in Rome’s LGBT+ community and explore many of the LGBT+ hang out spots in Rome. If you are looking to dance in Rome, we also have the best spots to dance. Just sayin’.

Rome surprised me once again when I discovered that just around the corner from this bar and the Colosseum is the Basilica of San Clemente. This is one of my favorite basilicas in Rome because not only is it stunning inside, but you can also explore unground beneath the church. The Basilica of San Clemente is actually built on top of the ruins of two previous churches. Beneath the basilica you can find the remains of columns, artworks, and even a water system that still runs today. The city of Rome was literally built from the ground up. Throughout history they continued building on top of older structures and the city continued to be raised. You can see just how much the city has been raised up from its original ground level if you visit the Basilica of San Clemente.

These are just a few of my favorite surprise spots that I have come across while in Rome. The list goes on and on and I’m sure it will continue to grow, which is why I plan to continue getting lost in this gorgeous city until I find every hidden gem.

Coming “Home” from Spring Break

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I have never been so thrilled to finish midterms before in my life as I was this semester. On Temple’s main campus, I do not typically have an actual “midterm week”. Usually, my midterms are more spread out or consist of performances or projects rather than just large exams. However, at Temple Rome I had to spend countless hours studying for exams the week before midterms and I will admit it was very stressful. However, it was all worth it the second I walked out of my last midterm. Freedom at last! It was time to embark on the adventure of a lifetime. I went straight from my midterm to the airport. My roommate came with me and actually almost didn’t make it, but the spring break gods were on our side. This spring break was one of the most unforgettable weeks of my life. I was so lucky to be able to travel with an incredible group of people and experience three different cities in 12 days. We traveled to Barcelona and Seville in Spain and then to Lisbon, Portugal, and finally back to Rome. We made so many memories that I will always cherish and met beautiful souls from across the globe. It truly felt like a dream. Whether we were climbing a mountain in Barcelona, riding bikes through the small city of Seville, or swimming in the ocean on the coast of Portugal, it was completely enchanting.

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Riding bike through Seville

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Enjoying the beach in Portugal

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On top of a mountain in Barcelona

As amazing as spring break was and although I was sad for it to end, it did feel good coming “home” to Rome. Even after just two short months living in Rome, it has already become like a second home. I especially appreciate it after traveling to other cities that are totally unfamiliar to me. It felt right to come back to a city that I feel like I know well. In Rome, I know how to get around and I walk the same familiar streets for my daily commute. I know where to get the best gelato and I have my favorite spot for aperitivo. I know the history of Rome now and have more of a grasp on the Italian language. I know where to go if I want to dance or if I want to have a quiet relaxing evening. It has taken some time, but I have adjusted to life in Rome and I would not trade it for any other city in the world. I am definitely falling in love with Rome and it is hard to believe that my time here is half way over. I am just going to keep pretending like I never have to leave, but since I do eventually have to leave, I am going to make the most out of my last two months here in Rome. I look forward to new discoveries and experiences as I continue to get to know the eternal city.

Masquerading Through Venice

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The month of February marks the annual Carnevale di Venezia, or Carnival of Venice. Thousands of people gather in Venice each year for the traditional carnival to see performances, visit the beautiful city and, of course, wear masks! The carnival is full of ornate costumes and beautiful masks. I made sure to take my time when buying my mask. When you have tens of thousands of masks to choose from, you want to get the perfect one.

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Venice is probably the most picturesque place I have yet to visit in Italy. There is a canal and bridge around almost every corner. My favorite place in Venice was the famous St. Mark’s Square. This is the only true square (well, rectangle technically) in Venice. It is in this square that I found the most breathtaking view of Venice. We went to the top of the Doge’s Palace tower in the square, from which there is an incredible view of St. Mark’s basilica, the water, and all of the city.

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Of course a trip to Venice would not be complete without a gondola ride. Be warned that the price for the gondola ride runs pretty steep, usually about 80 euros, but you can bargain with the gondoliers to lower the price and you can have up to 6 people in one gondola, so if you split the price with a group of friends, it is totally worth it! They usually take you on the Grand Canal and through some other beautiful, smaller canals. You can even get a gondola ride with a man who will SING to you in Italian. It honestly felt like a scene from a movie. If you still want to take a boat on the water but are looking for a cheaper option, try a boat taxi! Since the roads are so tiny in Venice, there are no cars. You can only get around by boat or foot!

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Being a water town, Venice is also famous for its seafood. I will admit, parts of the city definitely smelled fishy, but from what I am told that occasional fish stench in February is nothing to the overpowering fish smell in the summer. Regardless, I knew that I need to try a traditional Venetian seafood dish. I ended up trying nero di seppie, which is a pasta dish made with cuttlefish. The spaghetti and sauce is actually totally black because of the ink from the cuttlefish. It may not immediately look appetizing, but, trust me, it is delicious! There are also tons of different kinds of fish pizzas. I have a slight obsession with tuna so I got a pizza covered in onion and tuna. Yes, I ate the entire pizza by myself.

To celebrate the opening of the Carnival, there was a boat parade on one of the canals. There was a beautiful display of costumes, lights, and performances on the boats as tons of spectators squeezing in along the canal to get a glimpse. Probably the most interesting but less traditional “performances” of the weekend was the zombie walk. Tons of people prepared all morning putting on special effects makeup and gory costumes and then walked the streets of Venice. You would have thought you were on The Walking Dead: Venice Edition.

I have to say Venice is one of the most beautiful places I have ever been to and I definitely hope to be back to visit its charming canals one day.

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Chit Chat with Italians

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This week Temple University Rome hosted a chit chat with Italians that brought together American and Italian students from multiple schools. American schools represented in the chat included Temple and St. John’s University. Italian students that participated in the chat were from Sapienza University, LUMSA University and the Sport University, “Foro Italico”. The chat was a great opportunity to meet new people, practice Italian language, make some Italian friends, and discuss the cultural differences between the United States and Italy. American students were free to ask Italian students any question they had and vice versa. The chat was mostly in English, but also in Italian.16640888_1365496216848612_1695648932150387952_n.jpg

We first had an open discussion as a large group and talked about what was different than we expected in Rome and a common theme seemed to be the language barrier. Most of the students from the United States, myself included, anticipated that there would be virtually no language barrier in Rome. I expected practically everyone in Rome to be totally fluent in English, but I quickly realized that this is not the reality. While there are many people in Rome who do speak English and it is totally possible to get by without knowing Italian, there are also many people in Rome who speak little to no English. More people speak English in Rome since it is a more touristic area, but as you get further outside of the city into the countryside and non-touristic areas of Italy, less and less people speak English. Fortunately, while in Rome, I am taking an intensive Italian language course so I have Italian class four days a week for two hours each day. The class is tough but I am loving learning the language and it is extremely helpful! I’ve learned the basics and can at least communicate in Italian enough to meet new people, tell them about myself, ask questions, order food, and other essentials.

This chit chat was the perfect chance for me to practice some of the Italian skills I have been developing! I talked to a few Italian students and met some great people. I was able to get some recommendations of where to eat, go out, and see theatre in Rome. I even made an Italian friend named Barbara who helped me study for my Italian test. She also only lets me communicate with her in Italian when we use WhatsApp and pushes me to speak the language as much as I can. It’s great to have a native speaker to talk to and give me corrections. Plus, I am able to help her with her English. However, her English is exponentially better than my Italian, but I do my best!16473426_1365493653515535_3670342498145154223_n.jpg

One of the interesting Italian perceptions of Americans that I learned was that most Italians seem to be under the impression that United States citizens have been to all 50 states. When I was asked this, I laughed and said most Americans probably couldn’t even name all 50 states for you. I am very grateful that Temple hosted this chit chat because I was able to learn more about our cultural differences, misconceptions, practice some Italian, and even make some new friends! I looked forward to continuing to develop my Italian skills as I chit chat with the locals!16508789_1365492450182322_358863321747595905_n.jpg

Women’s March Around the World

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While for many the subject of the recent U.S. Presidential election is a difficult subject to talk about, it has become impossible to ignore. It soon became very clear that debate in my home country would have an effect on a global scale. On January 21, 2017, the day after President Trump’s inauguration, a Women’s March on Washington was organized. Sections of the Women’s March official statement reads as follows:

“We stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families — recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country… In the spirit of democracy and honoring the champions of human rights, dignity, and justice who have come before us, we join in diversity to show our presence in numbers too great to ignore. The Women’s March on Washington will send a bold message to our new administration on their first day in office, and to the world that women’s rights are human rights. We stand together, recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us.”

The Women’s March was not just about standing solidarity with all women, but standing together with all people from all diversities and backgrounds to fight for equality. It is undeniable that the Women’s March statement was right when it read “our presence in numbers too great to ignore.” According to University of Connecticut professor Jeremy Pressman and University of Denver professor Erin Chenoweth, more than 1 in 100 Americans participated in the historic March. The two estimate that as many as 4.6 million Americans joined the March. The March was not limited to just Washington D.C. People marched together in cities all over the U.S. including New York, Chicago, Seattle, and the home of Temple University, Philadelphia! If those numbers and widespread geographic locations are not impressive enough, you should know that people marched together all over the world, including Rome.

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Although I could not participate in the March in D.C., I was extremely grateful to be able to participate in the Women’s March in Rome. Hundreds of people gathered together at the historic Pantheon for the March. While we did not have the 1,500 bodies required by authorities to physically march the streets of Rome, they could not stop us from our stand-in at the Pantheon. The event included inspiring testimonies and speeches from multiple locals, given in both English and Italian. There were also many musical performances in both languages. At exactly one o’clock PM, we took a one minute moment of silence, as would all the other Women’s Marches around the world. Then we all sang songs together such as “We Shall Overcome” and “Amazing Grace”. As I sang and looked all around me, I could not help but to be moved to tears. I am in a foreign country, surrounded by hundreds of strangers of all different sizes, shapes, colors, backgrounds, genders, sexual orientations, and identities, some from the U.S. and many from Italy and other European countries. I cannot describe the overwhelming compassion and kindness I felt among that diverse crowd of people, all gathered together for the same reason. There was such a strong sense of love and acceptance for my fellow human beings. I met many people and even embraced some strangers with a hug. I did not expect the Women’s March to reach all the way to Italy, but I could not be more grateful that it did. I will never forget that day. However, this is only the beginning. It does not end here. We will continue to make our voices heard and we will continue to fight for the equality of all people and we not silently allow our rights to be threatened. We are all part of one race: the human race. We all stand together.

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Possibly my favorite sign from the March in Rome

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